The Fed Has Already Imposed A "Cyprus Tax" On U.S. Savers

Via: Street Talk Live

Written by Lance Roberts | Thursday, March 21, 2013

Over the course of the last few days I have been swamped with media calls to discuss the “deposit tax” on Cyprus account holders and the potential impact on global financial markets and, more importantly, the possibility of such an event occurring domestically. (See recent Fox Business Interview) So far, Cyprus has not been able to pass such a direct tax against depositors and has gone to Russia for a helping hand. However, the question of whether such an event could happen in the U.S. is a much more interesting point of discussion.

While I find it doubtful, but not totally improbable, that a direct deposit tax would be instituted by domestic banks – the issue of the Fed’s monetary policies, particularly since the last recession, has had a significant impact on “savers.” As we have discussed in the past individuals are not “investors” but rather “savers.” Therefore, in planning for retirement, of which there is a very finite and generally short time frame within which to achieve that objective, individuals must not only have a return ON their principal, to maintain purchasing power parity of those saved dollars, but also the return OF their principal so that it may be reinvested to generate further returns. One without the other, as has been see witnessed first hand over the last decade, is a losing proposition in the achievement of those retirement goals. As my friend Doug Short recently showed in his amazing commentary on working age demographics – the age group that should be seeing declines in employment, 65 and older, are actually showing increases. The destruction of principal since the turn of the century, which is far more disastrous than it appears when adjusted for inflation, has ended the dream of retirement for many individuals.

Read more: here

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