Cyber Nuclear Hokum

Via: Sandia

Sandia was doing cyber before the term cyberspace existed. Today cybersecurity is a daunting national security problem, and we’re applying decades of expertise to the task. As the most networked nation on earth, the United States is extremely vulnerable. To keep systems safe and foil attacks, we develop protective technologies, conduct threat assessments, and analyze government, military, and civilian computer networks.

Read more: here

Unbelievable…Let’s create the threat, and then create a revenue stream out of it..This is pure evil!
People, I know you need a job, but stop helping this!
-Moose

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Obama’s Cyber Nuke Dream, Petraeus’ Love Child: Plus Message for US Congressman Hunter

Via: Cryptome


by John Stanton 

“Cyber Warfare, Cyber Security and massive Cyber Attacks are alarmist and vastly overrated. Look at what is going on in Cyprus. What could trigger a run on the banks in the United States? Something as simple as shutting down all the ATM’s for three days. The resulting panic and long bank lines could irrevocably shake confidence in banks and financial institutions, as Americans find out the significance of all the paperwork they signed when they established their banks accounts, fed by direct deposits. Since many in the country know what the country was like before personal computers and the Internet, they’ll do fine. Those people who have exchanged their hearts and brains for computer chips manufactured in Vietnam, and are tethered to Smart Phones and the Cloud, are due for a very rude awakening. You’ve heard of sleeper agents and moles haven’t you? I wonder how many sleeper programs are in the millions of computer chips that are now in every single facet of our lives.”

“The US Army Secretary [McHugh] states that the program converted to DA Civilian and military positions.

That was true up till a year ago but now the program is back to being filled by contractors. Why is that?

Likely due to having so many legal problems getting rid of people – good and bad. If the separate commands want a social science capability they can build their own team like CENTCOM did. They can provide the funding and the oversight. So many less issues that way and quite the savings! Though I agree with the intent of McHugh’s letter – to save an HTS type capability, I disagree with the saving the HTS program. McHugh sites ‘commanders’ assessments’ as reason to save the program. I doubt these assessments or at least their true value.

The House Armed Services Committee should have one of their educated staffers send a request to the team’s in theater requesting them to send in the products they have provided their current units for the last six months. A review of such products would show that a majority of such are just regurgitation’s of other products and lack any real operationally relevant info that was used in the day-to-day business of the units. The reason is very few, if any, HTS members have left their forward operating bases in the last 6-12 months to do what the program was designed to do. And now that US forces are handing over battle space to their Afghan partners, HTS work is for the most part limited to data-mining the internet and creating what the commanders ask for to support their desired course of action.”

And they rave about the performances on New York City’s Broadway? 

Read more: here

Attacks Used the Internet Against Itself to Clog Traffic

Via: NY Times

By JOHN MARKOFF and NICOLE PERLROTH
Published: March 27, 2013

An escalating cyberattack involving an antispam group and a shadowy group of attackers has now affected millions of people across the Internet, raising the question: How can such attacks be stopped?

The short answer is: Not easily. The digital “fire hose” being wielded by the attackers to jam traffic on the Internet in recent weeks was made possible by both the best and worst aspects of the sprawling global computer network. The Internet is, by default, an open, loosely regulated platform for communication, but many of the servers that make its communication possible have been configured in such a way that they can be easily fooled.

The latest attacks, which appeared to have subsided by Wednesday, have demonstrated just how big a problem that can be.

On Tuesday, security engineers said that an anonymous group unhappy with Spamhaus, a volunteer organization that distributes a blacklist of spammers to e-mail providers, had retaliated with a cyberattack of vast proportions.

In what is called a distributed denial of service, or DDoS, attack, the assailants harnessed a powerful botnet — a network of thousands of infected computers being controlled remotely — to send attack traffic first to Spamhaus’s Web site and later to the Internet servers used by CloudFlare, a Silicon Valley company that Spamhaus hired to deflect its onslaught.

This kind of attack works because the botnet exploits Internet routing software and fools Internet servers into responding to requests for information sent simultaneously by a large group of computers. The Internet servers that answer the requests are tricked into sending blocks of data to the victims, in this case Spamhaus and CloudFlare.

The attack was amplified because each of the servers in this case was asked to send a relatively large block of information. The data stream grew from 10 billion bits per second last week to as much as 300 billion bits per second this week, the largest such attack ever reported, causing what CloudFlare estimated to be hundreds of millions of people to experience delays and error messages across the Web.

Read more: here

Lockheed Martin: First in Federal Funding, First in Government Fraud

Via: Corporate Greed Chronicles

November 25, 2011

Part 1 of 4: Lockheed Martin, First in Federal Funding

Lockheed Martin is by many measures the U.S. government’s top contractor, raking in $16.7 billion in new contracts related to “IT products and services, systems integration, telecommunications, professional services and engineering services” in 2010 alone.

And that is only a fraction of what they bank as the top defense contractor at the Pentagon, where on any given day they announce billions in new contracts awarded to Lockheed Martin and other members of the Military Industrial Complex.

“True, Lockheed Martin doesn’t actually run the U.S. government, but sometimes it seems as if it might as well. After all, it received $36 billion in government contracts in 2008 alone, more than any company in history. It now does work for more than two dozen government agencies from the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy to the Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency. It’s involved in surveillance and information processing for the CIA, the FBI, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the National Security Agency (NSA), the Pentagon, the Census Bureau, and the Postal Service.”

“Oh, and Lockheed Martin has even helped train those friendly Transportation Security Administration agents who pat you down at the airport. Naturally, the company produces cluster bombs, designs nuclear weapons, and makes the F-35 Lightning (an overpriced, behind-schedule, underperforming combat aircraft that is slated to be bought by customers in more than a dozen countries) – and when it comes to weaponry, that’s just the start of a long list. In recent times, though, it’s moved beyond anything usually associated with a weapons corporation and has been virtually running its own foreign policy, doing everything from hiring interrogators for U.S. overseas prisons (including at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba and Abu Ghraib in Iraq) to managing a private intelligence network in Pakistan and helping write the Afghan constitution.”

Read more: here

An Orwellian America

Via: Zero Hedge

Submitted by Tyler Durden on 03/15/2013

Via Gordon T Long

We are one crisis away from a police state. All the powers are in place. Someone will flip the switch. Whether a Cyber Attack, escalating Currency War tensions or a ‘terrorist’ attack by indebted college youth, it is only a matter of time and circumstance.

As a young man, I voraciously read George Orwell’s “1984”, Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” and Alvin Toffler’s trilogy which included “Future Shock”‘, “The Third Wave” and “Power Shift”. During the era of the Vietnam War, I wondered seriously about the future and how it was destined to unfold. Now being considerably older, I have the vantage point to reflect back on my early ruminations and expectations. Unfortunately, I am too old to alter the lessons that are now so painfully obvious. Instead, I pass the gauntlet to those who can understand and take action o what I have unavoidably come to expect for America.

Read more: here

It is gonna get messy…
-Moose

EXCLUSIVE – U.S. To Let Spy Agencies Scour Americans’ Finances

Via: Reuters

NEW YORK/WASHINGTON | Wed Mar 13, 2013 
 

(Reuters) – The Obama administration is drawing up plans to give all U.S. spy agencies full access to a massive database that contains financial data on American citizens and others who bank in the country, according to a Treasury Department document seen by Reuters.

The proposed plan represents a major step by U.S. intelligence agencies to spot and track down terrorist networks and crime syndicates by bringing together financial databanks, criminal records and military intelligence. The plan, which legal experts say is permissible under U.S. law, is nonetheless likely to trigger intense criticism from privacy advocates.

Financial institutions that operate in the United States are required by law to file reports of “suspicious customer activity,” such as large money transfers or unusually structured bank accounts, to Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN).

The Federal Bureau of Investigation already has full access to the database. However, intelligence agencies, such as the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency, currently have to make case-by-case requests for information to FinCEN.

The Treasury plan would give spy agencies the ability to analyze more raw financial data than they have ever had before, helping them look for patterns that could reveal attack plots or criminal schemes.

The planning document, dated March 4, shows that the proposal is still in its early stages of development, and it is not known when implementation might begin.

Read more: here 

Don’t worry…nothing can go wrong with this plan….
But maybe they could just direct deposit some of the money that the FED is making up in my account….
-Moose

Freedom of the Press Foundation Publishes Leaked Audio of Bradley Manning’s Statement

Via: Press Freedom Foundation

March 11, 2013

By Trevor Timm Rainey Reitman

Today, Freedom of the Press Foundation is publishing the full, previously unreleased audio recording of Private First Class Bradley Manning’s speech to the military court in Ft. Meade about his motivations for leaking over 700,000 government documents to WikiLeaks.

In addition, we have published highlights from Manning’s statement to the court.

While unofficial transcripts of this statement are available, this marks the first time the American public has heard the actual voice of Manning.

Read more: here

Older, Quieter Than WikiLeaks, Cryptome Perseveres

Via: The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published: March 9, 2013 at 12:07 PM ET

NEW YORK (AP) — The FBI came calling after maps of urban rail tunnels and gas lines were posted online. Microsoft aggressively complained following the website’s publication of a confidential handbook on company policies for helping police. Other critics have gone further, warning that some of the postings could aid America’s enemies.

Yet Cryptome carries on.

The website, unfamiliar to the general public, is well-known in circles where intelligence tactics, government secrets and whistle-blowing are primary concerns. Since its creation in 1996, Cryptome has amassed more than 70,000 files — including lists of secret agents, high-resolution photos of nuclear power plants, and much more.

Its co-founder and webmaster, a feisty 77-year-old architect, doesn’t hesitate when asked why.

“I’m a fierce opponent of government secrets of all kinds,” says John Young. “The scale is tipped so far the other way that I’m willing to stick my neck out and say there should be none.”

Read more: here

‘The Coming Surveillance Dystopia’

Via: Cryptogon

March 8th, 2013

I wasn’t going to post this. You know all of this, or, at least you should, if you’ve been hanging out here for any length of time.

But, Holder, “Dressed like Elvis and surrounded by the Real Housewives of Orange County,” won me over.

Must share.

Via: The Verge:

Assuming that some degree of privacy is still possible, most people don’t seem to think it’s worth the effort. The cypherpunks and their ilk fought to keep things like the PGP encryption program legal — and we don’t use them. We know Facebook and Google leak our personal online habits like a sieve and we don’t make much effort to cover our tracks.

 Perhaps some of us buy the good citizen cliché that if you’re not doing anything wrong, you don’t have anything to worry about, but most of us are just opting for convenience. 

We’ve got enough to deal with day to day without engaging in a privacy regimen. Occasionally, some slacker may lose his job because he posted a photo of himself cradling his bong or the like, but as with civil liberties more generally, as long as the daily outrages against individuals don’t reach epic proportions, we rubberneck in horror and then return to our daily activities.

Beneath this complacent surface lies a disquieting and mostly unexamined question. To what degree is the ubiquity of state surveillance a form of intimidation, a way to keep people away from social movements or from directly communicating their views?

Do you hesitate before liking WikiLeaks on Facebook?
Read more: here

Online Homeland Security Degrees & Certificates

I stumbled onto this…What could go wrong?
 
In the Post-9/11 world, few universities have the depth of curriculum and breadth of experience in homeland security education than the University. Our instructors are practitioners, many with unparalleled experience safeguarding the nation as military, intelligence, emergency management, public safety and homeland security leaders. The University is a pioneer in creating an interdisciplinary portfolio of the most critical degrees and certificates sought by homeland security professionals. And each course is taught entirely online. This unmatched flexibility gives motivated professionals the unique opportunity to learn the latest homeland security information and strategies while maintaining their existing work-life responsibilities.

See here: American Military University

Online Homeland Security Degrees & Certificates

I stumbled onto this…What could go wrong?
 
In the Post-9/11 world, few universities have the depth of curriculum and breadth of experience in homeland security education than the University. Our instructors are practitioners, many with unparalleled experience safeguarding the nation as military, intelligence, emergency management, public safety and homeland security leaders. The University is a pioneer in creating an interdisciplinary portfolio of the most critical degrees and certificates sought by homeland security professionals. And each course is taught entirely online. This unmatched flexibility gives motivated professionals the unique opportunity to learn the latest homeland security information and strategies while maintaining their existing work-life responsibilities.

See here: American Military University

Obama Signs Cybersecurity Executive Order Ahead of State Of The Union

Via: ZDNet

By Violet Blue for Zero Day | February 13, 2013 — 03:08 GMT (19:08 PST)

President Obama signed an executive order aimed at bolstering U.S. cybersecurity prior to tonight’s State of the Union address. The Order precedes a House Homeland Security Committee hearing on “new threats.”
It is the government’s latest move in attempting to deal with cyber threats, and the order has not undergone any public technical, rights-based, or privacy review.

The Order “enables the government to share more information with private industry partners and developing a new framework of practices to reduce cybersecurity risks.”

President Barack Obama’s Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity Executive Order is to “maximize the utility of cyber threat information sharing” – although the document does not define ‘cyber threat’, ‘cyber intrusions’ or exactly what will be shared for its information sharing provisions.

The Order requires the Attorney General, the Secretary of Homeland Security (the “Secretary”), and the Director of National Intelligence to issue implemenation instructions within 120 days.

Privacy and digital rights may take a back seat as the assesment of privacy concerns and civil liberties risks is being kept in-house.

Read more: here

Ya  think? Again, why the rampant escalation of these “Security Provisions”? And why do the citizens lose some more rights/personal freedoms every time?
-Moose

Obama Signs Cybersecurity Executive Order Ahead of State Of The Union

Via: ZDNet

By Violet Blue for Zero Day | February 13, 2013 — 03:08 GMT (19:08 PST)

President Obama signed an executive order aimed at bolstering U.S. cybersecurity prior to tonight’s State of the Union address. The Order precedes a House Homeland Security Committee hearing on “new threats.”
It is the government’s latest move in attempting to deal with cyber threats, and the order has not undergone any public technical, rights-based, or privacy review.

The Order “enables the government to share more information with private industry partners and developing a new framework of practices to reduce cybersecurity risks.”

President Barack Obama’s Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity Executive Order is to “maximize the utility of cyber threat information sharing” – although the document does not define ‘cyber threat’, ‘cyber intrusions’ or exactly what will be shared for its information sharing provisions.

The Order requires the Attorney General, the Secretary of Homeland Security (the “Secretary”), and the Director of National Intelligence to issue implemenation instructions within 120 days.

Privacy and digital rights may take a back seat as the assesment of privacy concerns and civil liberties risks is being kept in-house.

Read more: here

Ya  think? Again, why the rampant escalation of these “Security Provisions”? And why do the citizens lose some more rights/personal freedoms every time?
-Moose