ashameduscitizen

There is no flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people. Howard Zinn

I Have a Dream..A Nightmare Really..

By Moose


From the war criminal archive…

I had a drone dream the other night…and it made me wonder….

How long before the drones become personalized weapons?

Just think about this… 

Soon, 5 years at the outside, via our drone technology, we will be able to direct activity remotely at targets determined by autonomous recognition..

This will be great for rounding up a generation of war criminals…
Like Kissinger or Tony Blair..or Bush/s or Cheney…

Or banksters, or politicians that don’t fulfill their sworn obligation to uphold the constitution…

There will be a drone out there, waiting, never getting tired, or frustrated, or angry, or depressed, until the “Target” presents itself.. and then there will be no hesitation, no guilt, no remorse…

But you know the Empire will target us, dissenters, patriots, and freedom fighters first..

Maybe the machines will reintroduce morality into the Human experience…
 
It was just a dream…but it was so real..
It even had the target’s name on it’s nose…
But we should embrace every bit of the drone technology to protect ourselves…just sayin… 
This should be a good reason to pay attention in science class!
-Moose

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Mayor Bloomberg: Security Drones Over New York City Are ‘Scary’ But Inevitable

Via: Business Insider

Michael Kelley | Mar. 23, 2013, 12:18 PM

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg considers the domestic use of military-style drones “scary” but says that there is no way to stop it.

“Everybody wants their privacy, but I don’t know how you’re going to maintain it,” Bloomberg said on his weekly radio show. “It’s just we’re going into a different world, uncharted, and, like it or not, what people can do, what governments can do, is different … you can’t keep the tides from coming in.”

In September a Congressional Research report stated that domestic drones may be able to bypass constitutional privacy safeguards because of their high level of sophistication.

At least 81 entities, including 17 police departments, have applied for permission to fly drones in U.S. airspace.

But the mayor seems to be referring to something more omnipresent, like having drones with ARGUS technology flying 17,500 feet above the Big Apple while transmitting high resolution images of people.

“There’ll be cameras every place” within five years, Bloomberg estimated. “We’re going to have more visibility and less privacy. I just don’t see how you could stop that.”

Read more: here

Yes, there is a way to stop it…Don’t Allow It!  
How can you tell a politician is lying?
They are speaking…
-Moose

Drone Home

Via: Time

By Lev Grossman Monday, Feb. 11, 2013

A few months ago I borrowed a drone from a company called Parrot. Officially the drone is called an AR.Drone 2.0, but for simplicity’s sake, we’re just going to call it the Parrot. The Parrot went on sale last May and retails for about $300.

It’s a quadcopter, meaning it’s a miniature helicopter with four rotors; basically it looks like a giant four-leaf clover designed by Darth Vader. It’s noisy and a bit fussy: it spits error messages at you from a comprehensive menu of them, and it recovers from catastrophes slowly and sulkily. (Pro tip: quadcopters mix poorly with greenery.) But when it’s on its best behavior, the Parrot is a little marvel. You control it with an app on your smart phone, to which it feeds real-time video in return. Mashing the Take Off button causes it to leap up to waist height and hover there, stock still, in the manner of Harry Potter’s broomstick. It’s so firmly autostabilized that on a hot day small children will gather under it to get the cool downwash from its rotors.

It’s a toy, the robotic equivalent of a house pet. But just as cats and dogs are related to tigers and wolves, the Parrot is recognizably genetically related to some very efficient killers.

Flying a drone, even just a Parrot, makes you realize what a radically new and deeply strange technology drones are. A drone isn’t just a tool; when you use it you see and act through it — you inhabit it. It expands the reach of your body and senses in much the same way that the Internet expands your mind. The Net extends our virtual presence; drones extend our physical presence. They are, along with smart phones and 3-D printing, one of a handful of genuinely transformative technologies to emerge in the past 10 years.

They’ve certainly transformed the U.S. military: of late the American government has gotten very good at extending its physical presence for the purpose of killing people. Ten years ago the Pentagon had about 50 drones in its fleet; currently it has some 7,500. More than a third of the aircraft in the Air Force’s fleet are now unmanned. The U.S. military reported carrying out 447 drone attacks in Afghanistan in the first 11 months of 2012, up from 294 in all of 2011. Since President Obama took office, the U.S. has executed more than 300 covert drone attacks in Pakistan, a country with which we’re not at war. Already this year there are credible reports of five covert attacks in Pakistan and as many as eight in Yemen, including one on Jan. 21, the day of Obama’s second Inauguration. The Pentagon is planning to establish a drone base in northwestern Africa.

Read more: here

Oh yeah..Drones are great…
-Moose

Majoring in Drones: Higher Ed Embraces Unmanned Aircraft

Via: Time

By Victor LuckersonMarch 18, 2013

Zachary Waller always wanted to be a commercial airline pilot as a kid. The prestige and paycheck associated with being the captain of a huge airliner appealed to him. But shortly after he arrived at the University of North Dakota in 2008, he realized he could actually take to the skies and secure a good job without having his feet leave the ground. He decided to pursue a new degree that the department of aviation was offering — unmanned-aircraft-systems operations. He spent his college years studying drones.

“There were no textbooks,” Waller says of the program’s early years. “Nothing like this had ever been taught in an academic setting.” When he began studying unmanned aircraft in 2009, there were about 15 students in the major. Today, 120 students are enrolled in the program.

It’s not just a North Dakota phenomenon. Curriculums and research projects related to drones are cropping up at both large universities and community colleges across the country. In a list of 81 publicly funded entities that have applied for a certificate of authorization to fly drones from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), more than a third are colleges, according to FAA documents obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Schools — and their students — are jockeying for a position on the ground floor of a nascent industry that looks poised to generate jobs and research funding in the coming years.

“We get a lot of inquiries from students saying, ‘I want to be a drone pilot,’” says Ken Polovitz, the assistant dean in the University of North Dakota’s John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences. “The Grand Forks region has become a hotbed for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).”

Read more: here

This is great…
Learning to kill better….
Can’t wait till one of these kids go rogue….
-Moose

Bombing of Cambodia Cited to Defend US Drone Strikes

Via: PPclic

A U.S. Justice Department document that says America can le­gally order the killing of its citizens if they are believed to be al-Qaida leaders uses the devastating and illegal bombing of Cam­bo­dia in the 1960s and ’70s to help make its case.

American broadcaster NBC News first reported on the “white pa­per”—a summary of classified mem­os by the U.S. Justice Depart­ment’s Of­fice of Legal Council—on Monday.

The 16-page paper makes a legal case for the U.S. government’s highly controversial use of un­manned drones to kill suspected terrorists, including some U.S. citizens. In making its argument, the docu­ment brings up the U.S.’ bombing of Cam­bodia—which claimed thousands of innocent lives in the pursuit of North Vietnamese forces—to ar­gue for the right to go after its enemies in neutral countries.

“The Department has not found any authority for the proposition that when one of the parties to an armed conflict plans and executes operations from a base in a new na­tion, an operation to engage the enemy in that location cannot be part of the original armed conflict,” the paper reads. “That does not appear to be the rule of the historical practice, for instance, even in a traditional international conflict.”

To help make its case, the Jus­tice Depart­ment cites an address then-U.S. State Depart­ment legal adviser John Stevenson delivered to the New York Bar Association in 1970 regarding the U.S.’ ongoing military activity in Cambodia.

Mr. Stevenson, the white paper summarizes, argued “that in an international armed conflict, if a neutral state has been unable for any reason to prevent violations of its neutrality by the troops of one belligerent using its territory as a base of operations, the other belligerent has historically been justified in attacking those enemy forces in that state.”

In other words, Mr. Stevenson, speaking on the U.S. bombing of Cambodia, said history gave the U.S. the right to bomb a country that could not keep the U.S.’ enemies out.

The Justice Department is now us­ing that argument to help make its case for killing suspected al-Qaida leaders of U.S. citizenship abroad.

The U.S. Embassy in Phnom Penh declined to comment.

Politicians kill people…
-Moose

Oregon Company to Sell Drone Defense Technology to Public

Via: US News

The company says it won’t knock drones down, but will stop them from ‘completing their mission’

By Jason Koebler March 15, 2013

Do you want to keep drones out of your backyard?

An Oregon company says that it has developed and will soon start selling technology that disables unmanned aircraft.

The company, called Domestic Drone Countermeasures, was founded in late February because some of its engineers see unmanned aerial vehicles—which are already being flown by law enforcement in some areas and could see wider commercial integration into American airspace by 2015—as unwanted eyes in the sky.

“I was personally concerned and I think there’s a lot of other people worried about this,” says Timothy Faucett, a lead engineer on the project. “We’ve already had many inquiries, a lot of people saying ‘Hey, I don’t want these drones looking at me.'”

Domestic Drones Countermeasures was formed as a spin-off company from Aplus Mobile, which sells rugged computer processors to defense contractors—though the company won’t discuss its specific technology because it is still applying for several patents. Faucett says that work has helped inform its anti-drone technology.

The company will sell land-based boxes that are “non-offensive, non-combative and not destructive.” According to the company, “drones will not fall from the sky, but they will be unable to complete their missions.”

Read more: here

Awesome!
-Moose

Army Officer Invokes ‘Terminator 3: Rise Of The Machines’ In Official Drones Paper

Via: Business Insider

terminator machines

One of the things Army Lt. Col. Douglas Pryer is known for is his mastery of words, but he still has a respect for pictures.

Pryer is a former intelligence officer who worked in various command staff in Iraq, Kosovo, Germany, and others. He’s also an award winning military author.

Plastered to the top of his most recent report, published by the Army’s Combined Arms Center, is a picture from the Terminator movies: a squad of evil looking humanoid machines, undoubtedly looking for human victims.

Pryer even named the paper after the last of these movies. He calls the paper “The Rise Of The Machines: Why Increasingly ‘Perfect’ Machines Help Perpetuate Our Wars And Endanger Our Nations.”

So it’s not hard to see what Pryor thinks about the global drone war, even without reading a word.

If a few words had to be picked though, let them be the most terrifying collection.

Along the way Pryer writes that he wishes he believed that America would one day look back at transnational drone strikes as a morally disastrous policy that our nation briefly toyed with at the turn of the century, before gaining wisdom from this folly.”

He believes himself to be optimistic in this regard though. A dreamer. Instead, a combination of an American feeling of blind moral superiority and technological supremacy make the development of Spartan robots seem like a foregone conclusion.

Then he drops this dystopic doozy:

[The U.S. seems bound to develop] robots so advanced that they make today’s Predators and Reapers look positively impotent and antique. These killer robots, though, will share one thing in common with their primitive progenitors: with remorseless purpose, they will stalk and kill any human deemed “a legitimate target” by their controllers and programmers.

Read more: here

I said this was gonna happen……
-Moose

US Drones Bombing Africa Operated From RAF Bases In The Heart of The Lincolnshire Countryside

Via: The Daily Mail

By Robert Verkaik, Mail On Sunday Security Editor

An RAF base in Britain is being used by America in its controversial drone warfare campaign, it was claimed last night.

Documents seen by The Mail on Sunday reveal that the United States has established a drone ‘operations centre’ in the heart of the Lincolnshire countryside which could be used to co-ordinate attacks in the Middle East and Africa.

Last night, the revelation sparked claims of British complicity in the US Airforce (USAF) assassination programme which is being investigated by the United Nations.

One document requests US security-cleared staff to work at RAF Waddington on a USAF drone called the Predator. The weapon has killed hundreds of people in Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen.

A second document describes a role for a communications technician at the same base ‘supporting 24/7 operations of critical real-time USAF/ANG [Air National Guard] mission operations’.

Bosh Global Services, the US company recruiting personnel, designs and maintains key drone equipment for the American military and has established a base in Lincolnshire, believed to be at RAF Waddington.

The site has been designated Britain’s first drone centre and will have five fully armed Reapers from next year.

Read more: here

Thank goodness we will never have armed drones in the US…
-Moose 

Why a Drone Can Hover Over Your Home, And You Can’t Stop It..Yet

Via: Yahoo


Lost in the controversy over the federal government’s use of military drones is an issue that hits home: Commercial drones that can videotape you in your backyard.

Under limited circumstances, the FAA has approved the use, starting in 2015, of drones owned and operated by citizens. Some will be used for commercial purposes; others will used for recreational purposes.

The FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 was approved by Congress and the president. It tasks the Federal Aviation Administration with setting policies for the commercial drone business by September 2015.

The act is mostly focused on air safety issues, but the implications of drones, with photo and infrared cameras, flying over personal air spaces is fraught with privacy issues.

Then there are the implications for commercial drones, news gathering and the First Amendment. Television stations spend millions of dollars on helicopters, which can show live video from a distance. Drones are the fraction of a helicopter’s cost, but they can’t fly as high as a helicopter under normal circumstances.

So what happens if a drone is hovering over your house as journalists gather news? Or what if it is drone owned by a police department? Or a news entertainment show like TMZ?

Read more: here

And don’t worry, They won’t be armed….
-Moose

US Drone Strikes Listed and Detailed in Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen

Via: The Guardian

Where has the US been using drones in attacks – and how many people have died there?

Are drone attacks becoming the face of modern warfare? The Bureau of Investigative Journalism has collected the comprehensive database of reported drone attacks.

It shows hundreds of attacks: up to 337 in Pakistan, largely along the tribal areas of Waziristan, especially in the northern part…

Plus there are another 35-45 recorded in Yemen and up to nine in Somalia.

The data also records the number of deaths, which could be up to 3,247 across the three countries, including up to 852 civilians.

Read more: here

Am I the only person bothered by this?
-Moose

US Gen. McChrystal Warns Against Drones

Via: thescottross.blogspot



In essence this is a warning from a four-star US General to his government about the use of drones, saying that if America uses them carelessly then it has no right to be outraged over extremist retaliation.

 Stanley McChrystal: “I question its universal validity. If you go back to the British tactics on the North-West Frontier, the “butcher and bolt” tactics, where they would burn an area and punish the people and say, “Don’t do that anymore,” and simultaneously offer a stipend to the leader while saying, “If you will remain friendly for a period of time, we’ll pay you”—that approach worked for a fair amount of time. It managed problems on their periphery. But it certainly didn’t solve the problems.

The tactics that we developed do work, but they don’t produce decisive effects absent other, complementary activities. We did an awful lot of capturing and killing in Iraq for several years before it started to have a real effect, and that came only when we were partnered with an effective counterinsurgency approach. Just the strike part of it can never do more than keep an enemy at bay.

And although to the United States, a drone strike seems to have very little risk and very little pain, at the receiving end, it feels like war.

 Americans have got to understand that.

If we were to use our technological capabilities carelessly—I don’t think we do, but there’s always the danger that you will—then we should not be upset when someone responds with their equivalent, which is a suicide bomb in Central Park, because that’s what they can respond with.”

Read more: here

Duh!
-Moose

Can U.S. Citizen Shoot Down Domestic Spy Drones? Question Looms

Via: DailyTECH

Jason Mick (Blog) – September 14, 2012 3:50 PM

Every single day / And every word you say / Every game you play, every night you stay / I’ll be watching you
Oh, can’t you see / You belong to me?

…that famous line of Sting and the Police perhaps best summarizes the warning delivered in a report released last week by the Congressional Research Service that suggests the growing army of drones flying over the U.S. airspace could be used to continuously monitor U.S. citizens.

I. Plans for Domestic Drone Spying Escalate 

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration in a recent report that it expects 30,000 commercial and government drones to be flying over the U.S. airspace within 20 years.  The drones will be cheap, will be able to stay aloft continuously, and can even be as small as an insect (so-called “nano-drones”).  All of that makes the perfect vehicle for something many great writers and philosophers have long feared — ubiquitous, uninterrupted government surveillance.

While it sounds like a paranoid flight of fantasy, that’s precisely the issue that was being discussed in last week’s report.  It comments, “In the near future, law enforcement organizations might seek to outfit drones with facial recognition or soft biometric recognition, which can recognize and track individuals based on attributes such as height, age, gender and skin color.” 

Read more: here

An interesting question…..
-Moose

Coming Soon: A $100 Drone To Do Your Bidding

Via: Coexist

Have some aerial photography you need done? Drones aren’t just for hunting terrorists anymore. Soon, you’ll be able to buy and launch your own UAV for cheap.

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)–or drones–have been used in the U.S. for over 50 years, largely for military purposes. It makes sense; drones can be used for surveillance and fighting enemies without putting pilots at risk. But there are plenty of uses for unmanned camera-equipped drones outside of the military, including documenting protest situations, monitoring fertilizer applications and water distribution on farms, and just taking pretty pictures.

Drones for Peace, a project currently working its way through the MassChallenge accelerator program, wants to bring these drones to the masses. The ultimate goal is a drone for aerial photography that sells for just $100. 

This is the first project for Rotary Robotics, a company that may eventually launch a whole line of drones for different applications. This first $100 drone is meant for general use. “We are engineers who were working in the military UAV space for awhile. We wanted to a create an aerial surveillance aircraft that was cheap enough that it would be accessible to everyone,” says cofounder James Peverill.

Read more: here

Building Your Own Drone for Personal Protection

By Moose
March 7, 2013

Vimana Flying Machine

Interested Readers: Mechanically Inclined Please Apply!

Since our government developed and deployed the drones that we as taxpayers paid for, I feel we should be able to build our own drones….Just to ensure the safety of our personal space.

And since our government, as well as the ——, have been forthcoming in the technology used to create the current drones, much of our “R&D” has already been done for us..Most of the technology is Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components, with some half-assed software.

This allows us to tailor our systems to take advantage of their weaknesses.

Localized differential GPS redirection as well as directed scaled EMP tools allow us to have a level of control of an area as never before. Huge improvements in battery technologies as well as newer sensor packages contribute positively to making a complete personal protection system.

I like to call it the “Umbrella”.

Reliable and deploy-able long duration system…Geostationary localization for up to 66 hours while providing robust data linking as well as autonomous personal safety awareness….

I will include step by step instructions and complete documentation. Your 3-D printer will come in handy for this project. My latest version incorporates a small rail protection system as well as an immersion cloaking ability. All units incorporate the latest AI functionality as well.

Please send me an email if you are interested…and no..I’m not an FBI man or CIA Dude.
And you should be willing to learn Morse code….

I’m a concerned citizen who wants to use my skills to help fight the Empire!

See link below to learn more how the government classifies personal drones
-Moose

Link to FAA for Experimental Permit

Obama Administration Says President Can Use Lethal Force Against Americans on US Soil

Via: Mother Jones

Yes, the president does have the authority to use military force against American citizens on US soil—but only in “an extraordinary circumstance,” Attorney General Eric Holder said in a letter to Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) on Tuesday.

“The US Attorney General’s refusal to rule out the possibility of drone strikes on American citizens and on American soil is more than frightening,” Paul said Tuesday. “It is an affront the constitutional due process rights of all Americans.”

Read more: here

Un Fricking Believable..Yeah, all it would take is another allowed/staged/coordinated incident to require the president to use drones on Americans in America…
This is a problem people……
-Moose

What If a Drone Attacked in the US?

Via: ICH

By Camillo Mac Bica

March 05, 2013 “Information Clearing House” – “This just in: Iran has utilized its newly developed drone capability to execute three members of the Mujahedeen e-Khalq (MEK), aka the People’s Mujahideen of Iran, a terrorist organization responsible for killing and injuring many hundreds of Iranians, including Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan and four other civilian university professors and scientists.

The strike took place early Tuesday morning in a suburb outside Cleveland, Ohio.

The Iranian intelligence agency reports that the three targeted individuals killed in the attack were senior MEK operational leaders. Sources on the ground report that in addition to three adult males, 10 American civilians, four women and six children were also killed. While Iranian officials have not acknowledged the civilian deaths, they do recognize that despite due care, precision weaponry and the best of intentions, the reality of war is such that sometimes collateral damage is unavoidable.

“US officials have, for many years, recognized MEK as a terrorist organization responsible for numerous acts of terrorism including the murder of Americans in Iran and the attack on the American Embassy in Benghazi. Yet for reasons still unclear, MEK has recently been delisted from the terror list (curiously soon after the assassination of Professor Roshan) thanks to the efforts of “dignitaries” like former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, former Vermont Governor Howard Dean, former Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge, US Homeland Security Advisory Council member Lee Hamilton and Israeli apologist Alan Dershowitz.

Further, given our strained relations with Iran, the US has refused to discontinue its support for MEK nor will it grant the Iranian Government’s request that MEK terrorists be arrested and extradited to Iran to stand trial for their terrorist activities.

Read more: here

Just a matter of time…
-Moose

DHS Built Domestic Surveillance Tech Into Predator Drones

Via: CNET

Homeland Security’s specifications say drones must be able to detect whether a civilian is armed. Also specified: “signals interception” and “direction finding” for electronic surveillance.

March 2, 2013 11:30 AM PST 

 

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has customized its Predator drones, originally built for overseas military operations, to carry out at-home surveillance tasks that have civil libertarians worried: identifying civilians carrying guns and tracking their cell phones, government documents show.

The documents provide more details about the surveillance capabilities of the department’s unmanned Predator B drones, which are primarily used to patrol the United States’ northern and southern borders but have been pressed into service on behalf of a growing number of law enforcement agencies including the FBI, the Secret Service, the Texas Rangers, and local police.

Homeland Security’s specifications for its drones, built by San Diego-based General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, say they “shall be capable of identifying a standing human being at night as likely armed or not,” meaning carrying a shotgun or rifle. They also specify “signals interception” technology that can capture communications in the frequency ranges used by mobile phones, and “direction finding” technology that can identify the locations of mobile devices or two-way radios.

Read more: here

And don’t worry, we won’t use armed drones in the US…
-Moose

DHS Built Domestic Surveillance Tech Into Predator Drones

Via: CNET

Homeland Security’s specifications say drones must be able to detect whether a civilian is armed. Also specified: “signals interception” and “direction finding” for electronic surveillance.

March 2, 2013 11:30 AM PST 

 

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has customized its Predator drones, originally built for overseas military operations, to carry out at-home surveillance tasks that have civil libertarians worried: identifying civilians carrying guns and tracking their cell phones, government documents show.

The documents provide more details about the surveillance capabilities of the department’s unmanned Predator B drones, which are primarily used to patrol the United States’ northern and southern borders but have been pressed into service on behalf of a growing number of law enforcement agencies including the FBI, the Secret Service, the Texas Rangers, and local police.

Homeland Security’s specifications for its drones, built by San Diego-based General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, say they “shall be capable of identifying a standing human being at night as likely armed or not,” meaning carrying a shotgun or rifle. They also specify “signals interception” technology that can capture communications in the frequency ranges used by mobile phones, and “direction finding” technology that can identify the locations of mobile devices or two-way radios.

Read more: here

And don’t worry, we won’t use armed drones in the US…
-Moose

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