More Than 101 Million Working Age Americans Do Not Have A Job

Via: The Economic Collapse Blog

By Michael, on April 7th, 2013

The jobs recovery is a complete and total myth. The percentage of the working age population in the United States that had a job in March 2013 was exactly the same as it was all the way back in March 2010. In addition, as you will see below, there are now more than 101 million working age Americans that do not have a job. But even though the employment level in the United States has consistently remained very low over the past three years, the Obama administration keeps telling us that unemployment is actually going down. In fact, they tell us that the unemployment rate has declined from a peak of 10.0% all the way down to 7.6%. And they tell us that in March the unemployment rate fell by 0.1% even though only 88,000 jobs were added to the U.S. economy. But it takes at least 125,000 new jobs a month just to keep up with population growth. So how in the world are they coming up with these numbers? Well, the reality is that the entire decline in the unemployment rate over the past three years can be accounted for by the reduction in size of the labor force. In other words, the Obama administration is getting unemployment to go down by pretending that millions upon millions of unemployed Americans simply do not want jobs anymore. We saw this once again in March. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 600,000 Americans dropped out of the labor market during that month alone. That pushed the labor force participation rate down to 63.3%, which is the lowest it has been in more than 30 years. So please don’t believe the hype. The sad truth is that there has been no jobs recovery whatsoever.

If things were getting better, there would not be more than 101 million working age Americans without a job.

Read more: here

Hey…That’s not what Fox News said…
-Moose

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The ‘It Can’t Happen Here’ Syndrome

Via: WND

Exclusive: Patrice Lewis tries to warn distracted Americans of looming economic crash 

Here is a short quiz for you. Ready?

What’s the current situation with Lindsay Lohan’s rehab?

Who won the latest “Dancing With the Stars”?

Name five celebrities with “baby bumps.”

Explain how the Cypriot banking crisis could impact the European economy.

If you answered the first three questions but are clueless on the fourth, you’re in good company. Estimates are that up to half the population in America is ignorant about the situation in Cyprus. Oh sure, they hear snippets on the evening news, but since it’s far away and happening to other people, they don’t worry about it.

These people are suffering from a Normalcy Bias.

Just what is a Normalcy Bias? Wikipedia defines it as a mental state that “causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster occurring and its possible effects.” It’s sometimes called the “It can’t happen here” syndrome. The assumption is that since a particular disaster has never occurred before, it never will. Any disturbing indications that something bad may happen are dismissed or trivialized.

Read more: here

Unemployment Is Really 14.3%–Not 7.6%

Via: Forbes


4/08/2013

The current job-creation numbers are meaningfully below the level we might expect during a period of record corporate earnings and the reaching of new peaks in the major stock market indices.

Let’s go to the videotape –

The unemployment rate is 7.7%. But, there is another 0.6% of discouraged workers,(about 800,000) mainly the young, minorities and those without the all-necessary high school diploma. Another 0.9% are only marginally employed (whatever that means) and have mostly stopped looking for a job recently. More crushing is the 5.1% of the workforce most impacted by the 2008 downturn, who are working only part-time and would prefer to have a full-time position. That 5.1% part-time workers total 8 million people, who mostly are having trouble making ends meet and most likely have no health plan from their employer, according to Bob Eisenbreis, vice chairman and chief monetary economist at Cumberland Advisers, a New York-based investment firm that makes useful comments on the economy.

These numbers added together suggest that the true unemployment level– when part-time workers are included– is 14.3%–meaning that one in seven of every potential full-time employee in the U.S. economy is not able to earn a proper living wage–and thereby contribute to the snails-pace of economic growth.

Read more: here

Sprawling and Struggling: Poverty Hits America’s Suburbs

Via: In Plain Sight

Fri Mar 22, 2013 David Friedman / NBC News
By Allison Linn, Staff Writer, NBC News

WEST HARTFORD, Conn. – Like many Americans who move to the suburbs, Tara Simons came to West Hartford because she wanted her daughter to grow up in a nice, safe place with good schools.

Her fall from a more financially secure suburban life to one among the working poor also happened for the same reason it’s happened to so many others. She had a bout of unemployment and couldn’t find a new job that paid very well.

As a single mother, that’s made it hard to hold on to the suburban life that is, in her mind, key to making sure her daughter gets off to the right start.

“I’m basically paying to say I live in West Hartford,” she said. “It is worth it.”

It’s a struggle that many Americans bruised by the weak economy can relate to.

The number of suburban residents living in poverty rose by nearly 64 percent between 2000 and 2011, to about 16.4 million people, according to a Brookings Institution analysis of 95 of the nation’s largest metropolitan areas. That’s more than double the rate of growth for urban poverty in those areas.

“I think we have an outdated perception of where poverty is and who it is affecting,” said Elizabeth Kneebone, a fellow at the Brookings Institution and co-author of the research. “We tend to think of it as a very urban and a very rural phenomenon, but it is increasingly suburban.”

Simons’ situation is complicated by the fact she’s a single mom. Poverty and financial insecurity among single moms is far higher than for households headed by single dads or two parents.

The rate of poverty among single mothers actually improved dramatically through the 1990s, thanks to a strong economy, more favorable tax breaks and the success of so-called welfare-to-work programs. But two recessions and years of high unemployment erased many of those gains.

Read more: here

UK Workers Suffer Sharpest Wage Fall of Any Developed Country as Business Leaders Warn the Pain is Far From Over

Via: This is Money

By Rachel Rickard Straus
PUBLISHED: 06:27 EST, 7 March 2013

British workers have seen their wages plummet faster than any other workforce in a developed economy, a new study reveals today.

Real wages dropped by 4.5 per cent between 2007 and 2011, leaving workers with smaller incomes at a time of rising costs for basic necessities such as food, fuel, gas and electricity – not to mention housing costs.

This marks a considerably sharper squeeze than the 2.7 per cent fall in Italy or 0.7 per cent drop in Japan, according to the report from the TUC.

Meanwhile wages in Australia and Canada grew by 6.9 per cent and 5.4 per cent respectively.

The bulk of the decline was seen in 2011, the Coalition’s first full year in office, when wages shrank by 3.5 per cent – nearly twice as fast as in Spain, the second worst-performing economy that year.

The figures come as British business groups warned today that conditions in the UK economy are likely to remain tough for some time.

Read more: here

US Bureau of Prisons Location Maps

Via: Cryptome

US Bureau of Prisons Location Maps or America’s biggest business outside of Our Murderous Military…

Read more: here

I know of about 600 individuals that could be immediately added to the prison population…I have their locations here, here, and here….
-Moose

US Bureau of Prisons Location Maps

Via: Cryptome

US Bureau of Prisons Location Maps or America’s biggest business outside of Our Murderous Military…

Read more: here

I know of about 600 individuals that could be immediately added to the prison population…I have their locations here, here, and here….
-Moose

How To Treat Your Employees

Via: Tech Crunch

By James Altucher

Here are my rules for employees:

A) Treat them as if they are eventually going to be better than you. You can learn from every one of them before you have to fire them or before they abandon you.

B) Picture that all of them will eventually start their own businesses and you are just training them. This doesn’t mean be nice to them all the time. It means train them to start their own businesses. In my first business a bunch of employees broke free, stole some clients, and started their own business. Now they are doing very well. My partners hated them. I love them. It’s good to have many friends who look back and appreciate what you did for them.

C) If an employee gets the “disease” (all they want is more money and they don’t care about anything else and they start to have an attitude) then instantly fire them. There is no cure for the disease and it’s highly contagious.

D) No employee is allowed to say a bad thing about any client. Everyone has to love the client’s products. No gossip. No jokes. Worst situation: One time we had a proposal to send to the U.S. Post Office. Everyone worked very hard on it and we got it done just in time. The project manager FedExed the proposal to the Post Office. Fed. Ex. He was tired because his wife had just had a baby in the prior month. We had to fire him that very night. Nor did we win the job.

E) No gossip about anyone. I was guilty of this as a VC. I would talk badly ab0ut one of the CEOs we invested in. One of my partners told him everything I said. The CEO eventually went bankrupt anyway but he has since written a novel where I am the evil character. Gossip is a seed that gets twisted into history.

F) I picture every employee calling home at night to their mother. The mother asks, “how was your day at work?” I picture the employee saying, “Mom, it was the best.” I picture the mother crying tears of happiness because the baby that once came out of her is so happy to be working with me. I try to make that happen every day.

G) Teach the employee how to exploit you for their own gains. You certainly exploit them. Not in a bad way. You have to exploit them. You charge more for their services than you pay them and than you pay for all of your fixed expenses. That’s how you get rich so it’s worth it. But ultimately they have to exploit you to feel good about the relationship. When you both die there should be no bad feelings that linger among the maggots you share between your graves.

H) How can they exploit you? By building a rolodex off of yours. By learning your skill set. By learning how you deal with your failures. By learning not to repeat your mistakes. By eventually stealing some of your clients and employees and breaking off to start a business or take a higher position at a competitor. None of these things are bad things. You want them to do this. If you train them how to do this then it all becomes a good thing for you in the long run even though you might not see that. If you act with abundance in these situations then abundance will come to you. Too many bosses act with fear and scarcity and ultimately scarcity will come to them.

I) Teach them how to sell. Even if they are programmers. Programmers are often introverted and think they can’t sell. I’m a programmer. Because of their introversion, programmers are often seen as more trustworthy by the clients. Bring programmers or introverts to your meetings. They listen the best and they are the best sales people but they don’t know it.

J) Surprise them. Employees are like “reverse clients.” You have to please them just like you please a client. It doesn’t cost much to reward an employee who gets a job done. Gift certificates, dinners, get a masseuse to come in every Friday, write employees personal notes about what you liked about their work, and so on. Employees, like clients, are the gift that keep giving. They are all there to make you wealthy so you need to be infinitely grateful to them and, ultimately, help them get wealthy.

Read more: here

On Job Openings the Minimum Wage and Being Middle Class

Via: Zero Hedge

Submitted by Bruce Krasting on 02/13/2013 21:37 -0500

I had lunch with a friend, he was bitching and moaning about business. He’s having a very hard time closing deals – and he only gets paid when there are deals.

This fellow is a headhunter. He specializes in supplying people for the medical industry. One of his clients has given him a sweet assignment – they have a dozen job openings that need to be filled – yesterday. The job description is OT – PT (Occupational or Physical Therapist). Some additional details:

Compensation: $100 per hour.
Location: Metro NY.
Terms: This is Per Diem work. There are no benefits.

Job Requirements: The applicant must have a graduate degree and at least two year of work experience.

Hours per week: Minimum of 40. There will be the opportunity to work more hours, but the $100/hr rate stays the same.

Long Term Prospects: Most of the jobs will be converted into full time positions with an excellent benefit package in less than one-year. The per diem option will remain open. (Full time work with benefits is less than $100/hr)

Micro Economics: There are no benefits and the taxes will be high. One should expect to pay 40% taxes (11% NY State/City and this income will be subject to the new, top Federal bracket). In NY, the out of pocket cost for medical insurance is $1,000 per month ($2k for a family plan). This brings the take home, after tax and after medical insurance to $55/hr. At 45 hrs a week, 50 weeks a year, it means a take home of $123k – call it 10 grand a month of spending money. Not bad at all.

Macro Economics: To get this job you must have six years of education – four years of college, two more for the graduate work. What does that cost? It could cost over $200,000. I’ll assume only $100k. The payback on that is $1,000 per month for ten years. In addition, there is the lost income for the six years that it takes to get an education; I’ll exclude that. When you factor in the debt, it brings the real disposable income down to $9k a month.

So what’s my friend groaning about? It’s been two weeks, and he hasn’t filled one of the jobs. There is a big shortage of people with these skills.

Read more: here

Don’t Fire An Employee And Leave Them In Charge Of The Corporate Twitter Account

Via: Forbes

Yesterday HMV, the beleaguered British entertainment retailer, laid off 190 employees, in an effort to cut costs and right its balance sheet. The company apparently pulled a large group into human resources and gave them the bad news. While this was going on, one employee, Poppy Rose, who had been an HMV community manager and thus had access to the corporate Twitter account, started live tweeting about the layoffs.

Read more: here